Is Noctiva a Good Treatment for Nighttime Trips to the Bathroom?

Noctiva is the first drug that FDA has approved for frequent nighttime urination. Unfortunately, the low dose (0.83 mcg) isn’t effective and the high dose (1.66 mcg) can cause serious side effects. It would be more effective to treat the cause of nighttime urination, so patients should talk to their doctors to consider possible causes before considering Noctiva. Do the benefits outweigh the risks for most patients? Since the benefits are small and the risks can be serious, Noctiva is probably not the best solution for most patients. Some patients may benefit from it without any harmful side effects, but the research doesn’t help us predict who those patients would be.

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Treatments for Stress Incontinence in Women

While stress incontinence may feel embarrassing or demoralizing, remember that it is a medical condition that affects millions of women, and it can be lessened or cured without invasive surgery. Since Kegel exercises are the simplest, safest, and most effective treatment, it should be tried first, but must be done regularly. In fact, Kegel exercises alone, when performed correctly, daily, and for at least six weeks, are extremely likely to reduce symptoms. In the meantime, you can help reduce your symptoms by scheduling regular bathroom breaks, wearing an absorbent liner, or losing weight if you need to.

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Urinary Incontinence: a Guide to Treatment

Do you ever leak when you laugh or sneeze? Do you feel the constant urge to urinate, even when your bladder is empty? You may be one of the 10 million Americans with some form of urinary incontinence (the inability to control the bladder). Don’t be embarrassed–talk with your physician. It is treatable, and not inevitable.

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Irritable Bowel Syndrome Medication: Zelnorm and Treatment INDs

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an uncomfortable intestinal problem that affects nearly one in five Americans, most of whom are women. Unfortunately, known treatments only help with IBS symptoms, not the cause. More so, these treatments often have dangerous side effects. How is it that these drugs are still on the market if they are unsafe? The answer is because of a drug development process known as “treatment IND” (Investigational New Drug). The most recent of these treatment INDs involves a medication known as Zelnorm. What are the dangers, and should you take it for your IBS?

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